Yale New Haven Health Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response.

Online Education & Training

The Yale New Haven Health System Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response (YNHHS-CEPDR) offers a series of online courses on emergency preparedness topics for hospital, healthcare and public health workers.

The courses are available through contract. For additional information, please contact us at our offices listed below. At the end of each course is a brief quiz that tests your comprehension of the material and documents your completion of the course.


Yale New Haven Health System Center for Emergency Preparedness
and Disaster Response

Headquarters
1 Church Street, 5th Floor
New Haven, CT 06510
Tel. (203) 688-5000
Fax: (203) 688-4618
E-mail: Center@ynhh.org

Additional Locations
• San Juan, PR
• Washington, DC

 

Course Descriptions


Emergency Preparedness for Health Care at Work and at Home (EM 106)

EM 106

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course is designed to help health care workers understand their role in providing continuous care for patients in the event of an emergency.

At the completion of the course, learners will:

  • Recognize the types of emergencies and disasters that can impact health care facilities
  • Understand the phases of emergency management
  • Review the purpose of the Incident Command System
  • Prepare for their role and responsibilities
  • Review steps for preparing their own family

Downloads of preparedness materials are available throughout the course. Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Emergency Preparedness for Health Care with NIMS (EM 108)

EM 108

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course is designed to help health care workers understand their role in providing continuous care for patients in the event of an emergency. Included in this course is information equivalent to the FEMA ICS 700 program. Joint Commission requirements are met when employees learn about emergency preparedness and their roles in ICS/HICS at their health care organization.

At the completion of the course, learners will:

  • Recognize the types of emergencies and disasters
  • Recognize the benefits of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  • Understand the components of the Incident Command System (ICS/HICS)
  • Prepare for their roles and responsibilities
  • Review steps for preparing their own family

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Emergency Management for Health Care Facility Volunteers (EM 109 HDV)

EM 109

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The Yale New Haven Center for Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response has developed EM 109HDV as an awareness-level course that helps volunteers understand their role in providing continuity of care for existing patients and additional patients in the event of an emergency. This course includes the National Incident Management System (NIMS) requirements for IS-700. EM 109 HDV is time-efficient and relevant to health care volunteers. It provides information and action steps all volunteers can take to ensure they are prepared for disasters.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Introduction to Radiological Emergency Preparedness (EM 110)

EM 110

View/download course flyer (pdf)

Introduction to Radiological Emergency Preparedness (EM 110) is a 20 minute online course targeting nurses, doctors, radiology technicians, radiation oncologists, radiation safety officers, patient care associates, technical assistants nuclear medicine workers and EMS workers.

This course covers the following topics:

  • Basic principles of radiation
  • Definitions of terms commonly encountered in radiological and nuclear incidents
  • A description of the health risks associated with radioactive material
  • Recommendations for safeguarding personal safety during a radiological or nuclear incident
  • An outline of strategies for addressing the psychological impact of radiological and nuclear incidents

This course addresses the following competencies:

  • Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)
  • National Response Plan (NRP)
  • National Incident Management System (NIMS)
  • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
  • The Joint Commission

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers (Awareness Level) (EM 120)

EM 120

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course meets the awareness-level training requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and is a prerequisite for an operations-level course. The course provides information on hazardous substances and the risks associated with them as well as procedures needed to ensure the safety of health care workers and patients during a disaster or emergency event.

In addition, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize what hazardous substances are and the risks associated with them in an incident
  • Identify potential outcomes associated with an emergency created when hazardous substances are present
  • Describe the methods and observations that may be used to recognize the presence of hazardous substances in the work area
  • Review their role in their facility's emergency response plan when responding to an incident
  • List the ways employees can protect themselves during an incident

CME credit is available.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

N95 Respirator and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Training for Health Care Workers (EM 121)

EM 121

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The N95 Respirator and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Training for Health Care Workers (EM 121) online course uses both text and video to demonstrate the proper donning and doffing of the N95 respirator and personal protective equipment (PPE). This course offers the new or experienced health care worker an introduction or review of how to maximize their safety. The course is designed to align with current practices and terminology established by the OSHA Respirator Standard 1910.134(k), 1910.120, and the armed forces training requirements (USACHPPM, NHRC, AFRL).

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

N95 Respirator Fit Tester Training (EM 122)

EM 122

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The N95 Respirator Fit Tester Training (EM 122) online course provides an in-depth look at the fit testing process used to test the seal of the N95 respirator. The N95 respirator is worn by health care workers treating patients with infectious airborne diseases, including pandemic influenza. This course provides just-in-time training to health care workers that must perform fit tests using text, video, and a printable job aid.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Role of Medical/Technical Specialists During an Incident (EM 141)

EM 141

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course is designed to educate medical/technical specialists of their roles and responsibilities when a Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) has been activated.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Incident Command Systems for Health Care with NIMS (EM 142)

EM 142

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course is designed for all those who may serve in a leadership role in a health care organization during an emergency or disaster. EM142 helps health care leaders understand their role in managing continuous care for patients in the event of an emergency or disaster and to meet the federal requirements for ICS 100: An Introduction to Incident Command System and ICS 200.a: Applying Incident Command System to Health Care Organizations.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Incident Command Systems for Health Care with NIMS/NRF (EM 143)

EM 143

This course is designed for all those who may serve in a leadership role in a health care organization during an emergency or disaster. EM143 helps health care leaders understand their role in managing continuous care for patients in the event of an emergency or disaster and to meet the federal requirements for ICS 100: An Introduction to Incident Command System and ICS 200.a: Applying Incident Command System to Health Care Organizations. This course gives an overview of the National Response Framework (IS 800.b) which specifies how the resources of the federal government will work together with state, local and tribal governments, and the private sector to respond to actual or potential incidents.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Introduction to Evacuations (EM 150)

EM 150

View/download course flyer (pdf)

All hospitals are at risk for incidents that lead to partial and full evacuations, from water pipe breaks to fire to natural disasters to man-made incidents. If something occurs at your hospital, everyone needs to know what is expected of them, and how to support the facility during an evacuation.

At the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define approaches to evacuations, and describe their causes
  • Recognize the variety of scenarios that lead to certain types of evacuations
  • Describe tasks key to any evacuation
  • Name security concerns that affect evacuations and related procedures
  • Describe patient flow
  • Detail the concerns and suggested solutions involved in resource tracking

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Patient Movement During Evacuations (EM 151)

EM 151

View/download course flyer (pdf)

Hospital evacuations, partial or full, involve the movement of patients and equipment. Evacuations are often time-sensitive, and must be carried out quickly, sometimes with minimal resources. Use of proper techniques helps ensure that people are moved safely and effectively during an evacuation. Learning these procedures will help workers to protect themselves, their coworkers and their patients from injury in the event of an evacuation.

At the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate proper lifting techniques
  • State the appropriate ratio of workers to patients
  • Describe the types of special considerations that add complexity to a potential evacuation, as well as possible solutions
  • Describe the modes of possible transport during an evacuation, and the benefits of each
  • Name other response agencies that may be involved or impact your hospital evacuation

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Essential Elements of Mass Fatality Planning

No description is available for this course

Planning and Response to a Pandemic Influenza for Health Care Workers (EM 180)

EM 142

View/download course flyer (pdf)

Pandemic influenza outbreaks have occurred in at least the last four centuries. There are required aspects of preparedness and response for a major pandemic influenza that every health care worker should know in order to reduce sickness and death. EM 180 is designed for health care workers and volunteers.

This course:

  • Outlines the definition of pandemic influenza (flu)
  • Describes the types of influenza viruses and their potential for change
  • Describes strategies on how to prepare and respond personally and within your role in the clinical setting

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Bioterrorism Preparedness for Clinicians (EM 201)

EM 201

View/download course flyer (pdf)

"Bioterrorism Preparedness for Clinicians (EM 201)" is designed to prepare physicians and other clinicians for a bioterrorist event or other potential public health emergency. The course helps clinicians recognize bioterrorism agent disease syndromes, learn the precautions they should take, and understand their roles in the event of a public health emergency. EM 201 was tested with physicians prior to its launch on this site.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Advanced Radiological Emergency Preparedness for Clinicians (EM 210)

EM 230

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course attempts to address some misconceptions held by the clinical community about radiation and its potential medical consequences in order to minimize the potential for inappropriate treatment and suboptimal medical care for victims of a radiation or nuclear incident. EM210 is designed for clinicians with an interest in understanding radiation concepts, the medical effects of radiation on biological systems, radiation countermeasures and essential elements for dealing with radiological and nuclear emergencies in the health care environment.

The course aligns with current practices and terminology established through the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), National Response Framework (NRF), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Joint Commission.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers Operations-Level: Hazard Awareness and Risks (EM 220.1)

EM 220.1

View/download course flyer (pdf)

“Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers Operations-Level: Hazard Awareness and Risks (EM 220.1)” is designed to advance health care workers from awareness- to operations-level of training for health care-based decontamination teams. The course satisfies the OSHA competencies for operations level decontamination training and addresses: basic hazardous materials terminology, the risks associated with hazardous substances, recognizing the presence of and potential outcomes associated with hazardous substances and risk assessment techniques.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers Operations-Level: Personal Protective Equipment (EM 220.2)

EM 220.2

View/download course flyer (pdf)

“Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers Operations-Level: Hazard Awareness and Risks (EM 220.2)” is designed to advance health care workers from awareness- to operations-level of training for health care-based decontamination teams. The course satisfies the OSHA competencies for operations level decontamination training and addresses: the protection levels identified by OSHA, the different types of personal protective equipment used during the decontamination process, the process for donning and doffing Level C protection and respirator and the challenges and potential solutions associated with wearing personal protective equipment.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers Operations-Level: The Decontamination Process (EM 220.3)

EM 220.3

View/download course flyer (pdf)

“Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers Operations-Level: Hazard Awareness and Risks (EM 220.3)” is designed to advance health care workers from awareness- to operations-level of training for health care-based decontamination teams. The course satisfies the OSHA competencies for operations level decontamination training and addresses: the considerations for preparing for a decontamination event, the basic steps of victim decontamination, special decontamination considerations and the decontamination process.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Best Practices for the Protection of Health Care Facility-Based First Receivers (Operations-Level): Review (EM 220 R)

EM 220R

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course is a yearly review for participants who successfully completed EM 220. It covers OSHA requirements for the review from the three segments of the operations-level course. It includes information about hazards, risk assessment, hazard assessment, personal protection, and decontamination procedures.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Mental Health Aspects of Emergencies and Disasters for Non-Mental Health Professionals (EM 230)

EM 230

View/download course flyer (pdf)

"Mental Health Aspects of Emergencies and Disasters for Non-MentalHealth Professionals" (EM 230) is a 45-minute course to train health care professionals in the recognition, treatment and referral of patients exhibiting behavioral health consequences related to public health emergencies. The program incorporates brief video vignettes to enhance the learner experience.

CME credit is available. Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Small Victims, Big Challenges: Pediatric Triage, Treatment, and Recovery for Emergencies (EM 250)

EM 230

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course introduces clinicians to the needs of the pediatric population during a disaster and the widely used JumpSTART Triage System for pediatric victims. It also covers clinical manifestations and treatment for child victims of natural and human-caused disasters. Decontamination strategies are also covered.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Responding to the Medical and Functional Needs of Pediatric Populations During Disasters

This course is designed to provide an overview and highlight key points for the physical as well as the emotional care of the child with medical or functional needs, who due to natural or manmade disasters, present to an adult Emergency Department or a non-pediatric healthcare facility. The goal of this course is to improve the care of the child with medical and functional needs in the adult setting and alleviate some of the anxiety associated with an adult healthcare provider caring for this patient population.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Geriatric Preparedness, Triage and Treatment in Disasters (EM 260)

EM 260

View/download course flyer (pdf)

This course introduces clinicians to the needs of the geriatric population during a disaster and the widely used START Triage System for geriatric victims. It also covers clinical manifestations and treatment for geriatric victims detailing special considerations for this population. Decontamination strategies are also covered.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Planning and Response to a Pandemic Influenza for Clinicians (EM 280)

EM 280

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services warns that a severe pandemic influenza could potentially cause more illness and death than any other public health threat. There are essential preparedness steps to follow during a major pandemic influenza that reach beyond daily practice in health care facilities. These preparedness activities are critical to reduce morbidity and mortality and merit review to enhance preparedness and response for the clinician before and during a pandemic event. EM 280 is designed for clinicians, including physicians, mid-level providers, nurses, paramedics, respiratory therapists, physical therapists and pharmacists.

This course will:

  • Outline the definition of pandemic influenza (flu)
  • Describe the types of influenza viruses and their potential for change
  • Describe strategies on how to prepare and respond personally and within your role in the clinical setting

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Fall Prevention Course

No description is available for this course

Fall Prevention Course

No description is available for this course

Fall Prevention Course

No description is available for this course

Fall Prevention Course

No description is available for this course

HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules

No description is available for this course

Tuberculosis Training Program (ID 202)

ID 202

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The Tuberculosis Training Program (ID 202) is designed to educate health care workers on procedures when working with tuberculosis (TB) patients. The course is aligned with current practices and terminology established through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and The Joint Commission.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Bloodborne Pathogens Training Program (ID 203)

ID 203

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The Bloodborne Pathogens training program is designed to educate health care workers about the risks associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). This course adheres to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR 1910.1030).

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Reacting and Communicating Responsibly During an Emergency or Disaster

EM 120

This course is for anyone who may respond to or receive victims of a mass casualty emergency or disaster. It is divided into three sections, which include Preparedness, Response, and Recovery.

This course better prepares you to:

  • Understand the role of federal and regional support
  • Recognize stress and its causes
  • Recognize posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Prepare for the emotional impact of an emergency
  • Prepare to assist coworkers and survivors with the emotional impact during an emergency
  • Understand about providing mental health support
  • Understand the benefits of offering mental health support
  • Recognize those needing mental health care
  • Realize the problems with providing mental health support
  • Know the consequences of ignoring mental health needs
  • Recognize that humans are resilient
  • Watch out for individuals who may have ongoing problems
  • Realize that recovery is a process
  • Understand the relationship between stress reactions and physical health impacts

Reacting and Communicating Responsibly During an Emergency or Disaster: Just-in-Time

NCR2

Emergencies and disasters can have a powerful impact on all individuals involved. As first responders and first receivers, it is important that you understand and be prepared for how disasters may affect you, your coworkers, and the survivors of the disaster. This course is for anyone who may respond to or receive victims of a mass casualty emergency or disaster. It is divided into three sections, which include Preparedness, Response, and Recovery.

The First 72 Hours: Emergency Response Principles and Practices

NCR2

This course is designed to provide first receivers and first responders with an understanding of what to expect during the first 72 hours of a CBRNE disaster. It is divided into three sections, which include Preparedness, Response, and Recovery.

This course better prepares you to:

  • Understand the role of federal and regional support during a disaster
  • Define CBRNE incidents and identify special considerations, such as the types of impacts or injuries associated with each event
  • Understand key elements in the preparedness, response, and recovery phases of a CBRNE disaster
  • Understand possible risks associated with agents used in CBRNE events, such as risks due to radiation exposure
  • Identify regional and federal responsibilities during the 72 hour time period after the occurrence of a disaster
  • Recognize the type of personal and facility clean-up required after the occurrence of a disaster involving one of these agents

The First 72 Hours: Emergency Response Principles and Practices Just-in-Time

NCR2

When a disaster strikes, it is important for first responders and first receivers to understand their role in response to the disaster, as well as the type of federal and regional support that is offered. This course is designed to provide first receivers and first responders with an understanding of what to expect during the first 72 hours of a CBRNE disaster. It is divided into three sections, which include Preparedness, Response, and Recovery.

Introduction to Healthcare-Associated Infections (PS 101)

PS101

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 5-10 percent of patients treated in healthcare facilities develop a healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Approximately 2 million HAIs are associated with nearly 100,000 deaths each year in the United States. These statistics show that HAIs are now one of the top ten leading causes of death. This is an introductory level course that provides non-clinical healthcare workers with an overview of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), and ways to prevent the spread of theses organisms.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Preventing the Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms (PS 201)

PS201

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that 5-10 percent of patients treated in healthcare facilities develop a healthcare-associated infection (HAI). Approximately 2 million HAIs are associated with nearly 100,000 deaths each year in the United States. These statistics show that HAIs are now one of the top ten leading causes of death.

Since this is a growing problem in the healthcare community, this course focuses on the use of evidence-based practices suggested by leaders in healthcare to reduce the spread of HAIs, including Multidrug-Resistant Organisms (MDROs). It will incorporate the latest information on HAIs from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), and the Association of Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

This is an intermediate level course that provides healthcare workers with an overview of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), focusing on multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) and best practices used to reduce the risk of MDROs.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Preventing Surgical Site Infections (SSI) (PS 203)

PS203

View/download course flyer (pdf)

Surgical site infections (SSI) are the second most common healthcare associated infection (HAI) occurring in hospitalized patients in the United States. These infections account for approximately 22 percent of all HAIs. According to data from a 2007 National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) study 2.6 percent of all surgeries performed in the US are complicated by SSIs. Preventing Surgical Site Infections (PS 203) is an intermediate level program that provides clinicians with information on SSIs and prevention of SSIs.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

Preventing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) (PS 204)

PS204

View/download course flyer (pdf)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that each year, an estimated 250,000 cases of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) occur in hospitals in the United States, with an estimated mortality of 12 to 25 percent. Preventing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (PS 204) is an intermediate-level program that provides clinicians with information on CLABSIs and prevention of CLABSIs.

Estimated Course Time: 60 minutes

It's in Our Hands - Preventing Hospital Acquired Infections (PS DVD)

PS204

View/download course flyer (pdf)

Every year nearly 100,000 people die from hospital acquired infections. Many of the bacteria and viruses that cause these infections are spread through poor hand hygiene. The best defense for protecting patients is the consistent practice of proper hand hygiene.

It's In Our Hands contains information about:

  • The spread of infections through hands
  • Hand washing protocols
  • Effective communication approaches

Target Audience
All healthcare workers and those who will assist their organization in meeting The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal 07.01.01

Length
12:14 minutes

This online course is intended to provide volunteers of the Connecticut Radiation Professional Volunteer Program (CT-RPVP) with a description of the Program and its purpose, an understanding of radiation professional volunteers’ roles during a deployment, and awareness-level knowledge of radiation and its biological effects, radiation safety, radiological and nuclear threats to communities, external decontamination, risks to radiation professional volunteers when monitoring potentially contaminated individuals, and roles of government agencies during a radiological or nuclear response.

Course Objectives:

At the completion of this course, you should be able to: (1) describe the CT-RPVP and state its purpose, (2) identify the radiation professional volunteers’ roles when responding to a radiological or nuclear emergency, (3) describe the types of radiation, (4) identify the three basic methods for minimizing personnel external exposure, (5) distinguish between radiation exposure and radioactive contamination, (6) state the risks of contamination and exposure to volunteers when screening contaminated individuals, (7) describe the radiological and nuclear threats faced by the U.S, (8) identify symptoms of acute radiation syndrome, (9) distinguish between acute and chronic radiation exposure, (10) understand the decontamination process for removing radioactive contamination from body surfaces, (11) state the range of psychological responses experienced by individuals impacted by radiological and nuclear disasters, and (12) define the roles of government agencies during a radiological or nuclear emergency.